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A1. Lesson 11

Welcome to the eleventh practical lesson of the online piano and music theory course.

We will continue here what we worked on in lessons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10.

We will start this lesson with a piece to play on the piano. To do this, I suggest you watch the video below, with which you can learn to execute the work proposed by imitation.

Exercise 1: Study method

To begin with, I suggest you follow the study method to learn this work:

  1. reading notes of a) right hand, b) left hand, and c) hands together,

  2. rhythmic reading of a) right hand, b) left hand, and c) hands together,

  3. spoken melodic reading of a) right hand and b) left hand,

  4. execution without the rhythm of a) right hand, b) left hand, and c) hands together,

  5. execution with the rhythm (slow) of a) right hand, b) left hand, and c) hands together,

  6. execution a tempo of a) right hand, b) left hand, and c) hands together.

Pay attention to the correct fingering, dynamics, and articulation. It also pays attention to the position of the body, of the hand, and the correct execution technique. Mark the correct resolution of each of the exercises in this method in the margins of the score. Make audio recordings to self-correct if necessary.


Exercise 2: Execution

He executes the work, paying attention to the rhythmic and melodic precision, the fingering, the indications of dynamics, articulation, and tempo, the position of the body and of the hand, and to the instrumental technique. Make a video recording of your execution and self-correct it. If you find an error in the recording, repeat the exercise until you reach the proposed objective.


Exercise 3: Execution and count

Perform the work and count the times out loud. Make an audio recording to self-correct if necessary.


Exercise 4: Execution and singing

Perform the work with hands together and sing the right and then the left hand. Make audio recordings to self-correct if necessary.


Exercise 5: Memory execution

Perform the work without the help of the score. If you do not remember everything, put the sheet music back on the music stand and play it again. Repeat this exercise until you have memorized the entire work. Make a video recording of your performance from memory and self-correct it with the sheet music. If you find an error in the recording, repeat the exercise until you reach the proposed objective.


Exercise 6: Notes in Bass Clef

In the previous lesson, we exercised the location of the notes in the bass clef in the fourth line using cards and indicating the name of the notes and their octave on the back. This time I suggest you take the cards with the notes C3 to G3, mix them up, present them in random order, name the notes, and play them on the piano. This will help you smooth out difficulties in music reading and instrumental playing.


Exercise 7: Triad chords

In the previous lesson, we exercised the construction of the triad chords of the C Major scale in the fundamental state and inversions. Next, I propose to train the reverse process, that is, chord identification. To do this, write down the scale degree -using Roman numerals- and the chord position -RP (Root position), 1i (First inversion), 2i (Second inversion)- from the following graph, as shown in the example.

Exercise 8: Variation. Parallel thirds

Next, I propose you write the following melody in parallel tenths (compound thirds) and play them with hands together. I also recommend you perform the repertoire of lesson 2 in parallel tenths.

Exercise 9: Rhythmic reading

I propose you read the following rhythmic exercise with the metronome. You can beat the rhythm, sing it or play it on the piano on the same note (for instance C4) with the metronome or the video.


Repeat the exercise until you get a correct rhythm performance, adjusted to the metronome. Then make an audio recording using the metronome and listen to it to self-correct. If you find an error, repeat the exercise until you get a correct recording.


Exercise 10: Rhythmic sight-reading

After reaching the goal proposed in the previous exercise, I suggest you read the following rhythm at first sight.

I propose as the goal of these exercises to achieve a correct and adjusted performance from the first reading. To do this, analyze the rhythmic elements that each exercise contains. This exercise consists of eight measures in 3/4 using quarter, half, and dotted half notes and rests, and ties. To start reading, mark the pulse and perform the exercise mentally until you can do it correctly. Once this mental reading has been achieved, I suggest you make an audio recording with your first reading of this exercise, whether drumming, singing, or playing on the piano with the metronome. Finally, listen to the recording to self-correct yourself. If you find an error, repeat the exercise until you get a correct recording.


Exercise 11: Rhythmic Composition

Next, I propose you compose a rhythmic exercise of eight bars in 2/4, 3/4, or 4/4 using quarter, half, dotted half, or whole notes and rests, and ties, taking the previous rhythmic exercises as a model. The rhythmic composition exercises will allow you to consolidate the musical elements worked on, they will provide you with additional material to train rhythmic reading at first sight, and will prepare you to work on musical composition. After writing the exercise, record a rhythmic sight-reading of your composition and listen to it. If necessary, repeat the exercise until you obtain a correct recording.


Exercise 12: Rhythmic dictation

Next, I propose you write the rhythm in the following video from listening:

Listen to the exercise as many times as you want. If you need to, you can pause it, rewind it, or fast-forward it. To facilitate the recognition of the beat and the note values, the marking of the beat and the accents of the measure are included. In the beginning, a complete measure is heard with this marking. Write the time signature and the corresponding note values until you complete the exercise. Don't forget to include the bar lines and the end bar line. Once written, listen to the audio again to check. Then do a sight-reading of the exercise.


Exercise 13: Rhythmic-melodic reading

I propose you read the following rhythmic-melodic exercise using the metronome or the video.


To address this topic, you can train four abilities separately: a) spoken notes without rhythm, b) spoken notes with rhythm, c) intoned notes without rhythm, and d) intoned notes with rhythm. Then repeat the exercise without instrumental accompaniment, paying attention to the correct enunciation and intonation of the notes as well as the execution of the rhythm. Finally, record audio using the metronome and listen to it to correct yourself. If you find an error, repeat the exercise until you get a correct recording.


Exercise 14: Rhythmic-melodic sight-reading

After reaching the goal proposed in the previous exercise, I suggest you read the following melody at first sight.

In order to achieve an execution without errors and adjusted from the first reading, I suggest starting with an analysis of its elements. Regarding its rhythmic aspect, this exercise consists of eight bars in 4/4 using quarter, half, and whole notes. Regarding its melodic aspect, it contains four notes (C, D, E, and F) approached by conjunct motion and ascending fourths. To start reading, I suggest you read the notes mentally first without rhythm and then with a regular pulse to smooth out possible difficulties in these aspects. Then I propose you carry out a preparatory exercise of random intonation with these notes, corroborating with the help of the piano if necessary.

Finally, make an audio recording with your first reading of this exercise. If you find an error, repeat the exercise until you get a correct recording.


Exercise 15: Rhythmic-melodic Composition

Next, I propose you compose a rhythmic-melodic exercise of eight bars in 2/4, 3/4, or 4/4 using quarter, half, dotted half, or whole notes, and the notes C, D, E, and F, with repeated notes, conjunct motion, and ascending fourths, taking the previous rhythmic-melodic exercises as a model. The rhythmic-melodic composition exercises will allow you to consolidate the musical elements worked on, they will provide you with additional material to train rhythmic-melodic reading at first sight, and they will prepare you to work on musical composition. After writing the exercise, record a rhythmic-melodic sight-reading of your composition and listen to it. If necessary, repeat the exercise until you obtain a correct recording.


Exercise 16: Rhythmic-melodic Dictation

Next, I propose you write the rhythm and melody in the following video from listening:

Listen to the exercise as many times as you want. If you need to, you can pause it, rewind it, or fast-forward it. To facilitate the recognition of rhythmic elements, the marking of the beat and the accents of the measure are included. In the beginning, a complete measure is heard with this marking. Regarding the melodic aspect, this exercise has two notes (C, D, E, and F), which you can identify by their relative pitch. Write the time signature, notes, values, bar lines, and the end bar line. Once written, perform a first-sight reading to corroborate. Finally, sing on the audio.


Exercise 17: Musical analysis

When accompanying a melody with chords, the notes of the melody tend to coincide with those of the chords used. We call these harmonic notes or consonances, while the notes outside the chord are called nonharmonic notes or dissonances. Using the tonic and dominant chords and a melody in a fixed position from C to G, the notes are contained in these chords as follows:

  • C: Fundamental of the Tonic chord.

  • D: Fifth of the Dominant chord.

  • E: Third of the Tonic chord.

  • F: Not found in any of these triad chords, but part of the seventh Dominant (four-sound) chord G-B-D-F.

  • G: Found in both chords (Fifth of the Tonic chord and Fundamental of the Dominant chord).

Next, I propose you carry out a morphological analysis of the work proposed in this lesson and indicate with an x the nonharmonic notes taking into account the Tonic and Dominant chords executed with their respective fundamental notes with the left hand. You can correct your analysis by going to the guide for solving the exercises at the end of this post.

Exercise 18: Musical composition

Next, I invite you to compose a 16-bar double period from an 8-bar binary sentence using an accompaniment with parallel thirds. To do this, I recommend using the rhythmic and melodic elements that have been practiced.

Then, play the composed work, make an audio recording, and self-correct your play.


Exercise 19: Improvisation

Next, I suggest you improvise 8-bar parallel and contrasting periods on a dominant pedal using the following endings.

Exercise 20: Execution at first sight

Finally, I suggest you play the following work at first sight on the piano.

To do it, I recommend starting with a musical analysis, indicating the rhythmic, melodic, and morphological elements it exhibits. Then I propose to perform a mental execution with the help of the metronome. If you consider it necessary, you can address the rhythmic, melodic, and fingering elements separately in this mental preparation. Once prepared, I recommend making a video recording of this exercise with hands together (if you want, you can start making two recordings, one with the right hand and one with the left hand). The goal is to perform a correct and accurate execution from the first reading. If necessary, repeat the exercise. Finally, I invite you to compose and play new sight reading exercises using the elements worked on in this lesson.


Guidelines for self-correction

Exercise 1

Analyze the exercises or recordings taking into account the following guidelines

  1. Correct enunciation and/or execution of the notes.

  2. Rhythmic precision.

  3. Proper use of fingering.

  4. Correction in dynamics and articulation.

Exercise 2

Analyze the recording taking into account the following guidelines:

  1. Correct execution of the notes.

  2. Rhythmic precision.

  3. Correct use of fingering.

  4. Adequate execution of the dynamics.

  5. Correct execution of the articulations.

  6. Correct position of the body and hand.

  7. Correct execution technique.

Exercise 3

In the execution with the count of the beats of the bar, keep in mind:

  1. Correct execution of the notes.

  2. Proper enunciation of the beats of the measure.

  3. Rhythmic precision

Exercise 4

Analyze the exercise or recording taking into account the following guidelines:

  1. Correct execution of notes and rhythmic adjustment.

  2. Proper enunciation of the notes.

  3. Accuracy in intonation.

Exercise 5

Analyze the recording taking into account the following guidelines

  1. Memory execution.

  2. Correction in the indications of the score.

  3. Rhythmic precision.

Exercise 6

When you say and play the notes check:

  1. Correct note.

  2. Correct octave.

Exercise 7

Compare your exercise with the graph below.

Exercise 8

Compare the variation written with the graph below.

Exercise 9

Analyze the recording of the rhythmic reading taking into account the following guidelines:

  1. Correct execution of the rhythm.

  2. Precision in synchronous adjustment with the metronome.

Exercise 10

Analyze the recording of the rhythmic sight-reading taking into account the following guidelines:

  1. Correct execution of the rhythm.

  2. Precision in synchronous adjustment with the metronome.

  3. Correct execution from the first attempt.

In case of not achieving the proposed goal in the first reading, compose new exercises to train the rhythmic reading at first sight until reaching it.


Exercise 11

Check in the exercise you composed:

  1. The correct writing of the key, the time signature, the values, and the bar lines.

  2. Following the guides: two-voice exercise of eight bars in 2/4, using quarter and half notes.

Analyze the sight-reading recording of your rhythmic composition, following the guidelines proposed in exercise 10.


Exercise 12

Compare the rhythm written to dictation with the following graph

In case you find an error, you can continue exercising rhythmic dictation with the elements worked on in this lesson using the audios of your readings, your sight readings, and your own compositions.


Exercise 13

Analyze the recording of the rhythmic-melodic reading taking into account the following guidelines:

  1. Correct execution of the rhythm and precision in the synchronous adjustment with the metronome.

  2. Correct enunciation of the notes.

  3. Correct intonation of notes. To do this, listen to the recording playing simultaneously on the piano to self-correct yourself.

Exercise 14

Analyze the recording of the rhythmic-melodic reading at first sight taking into account the following guidelines:

  1. Correct execution of the rhythm and precision in the synchronous adjustment with the metronome.

  2. Correct enunciation of the notes.

  3. Correct intonation of notes. To do this, listen to the recording playing simultaneously on the piano to self-correct yourself.

  4. Correct execution from the first attempt.

In case of not achieving the proposed goal, compose new exercises to train rhythmic-melodic reading at first sight until reaching it.


Exercise 15

Check in the exercise you composed:

  1. The correct writing of the key, the time signature, the values, and the bar lines.

  2. Following the guides: eight bars in 2/4, 3/4, or 4/4 time using quarter, half, dotted half, or whole notes, and the notes C, D, E, and F, with repeated notes, conjunct motion, and descending fourths.

Analyze the recording of the reading at first sight of your rhythmic-melodic composition, following the guidelines proposed in exercise 14.


Exercise 16

Compare the melody written to dictation with the following graph

In case you find an error, you can continue exercising rhythmic-melodic dictation with the elements worked on in this lesson using the audios of your readings, your sight readings, and your own compositions.


Exercise 17

Compare your analysis with the following graph and explanation

The work is in C Major and consists of an 8-bar parallel period. The melody is presented with the roots of tonic and dominant chords. The first note of each bar in the melody corresponds to a harmonic sound.


Exercise 18

Analyze the composition taking into account the following guidelines:

  1. The work corresponds to a double period of 16 bars from a binary sentence.

  2. The accompaniment is presented with parallel thirds.

Then analyze the audio of the execution of your composition following the self-correction guides of exercise 1


Exercise 19

Analyze the recording of the improvisation taking into account the following guidelines:

  1. The motifs executed correspond to the stated rhythmic-melodic patterns.

  2. The consequent corresponds to the proposed model

  3. The overall execution is rhythmically and melodically accurate.

Exercise 20

Analyze recordings of sight-reading to self-correct. To do this, keep in mind:

  1. Correct execution of the notes.

  2. Precision and rhythmic adjustment with the metronome.

  3. Proper use of fingers

  4. Correct execution from the first attempt.

In case of not achieving the proposed goal, compose new exercises to train the execution at first sight until reaching it.


After completing the exercises in this lesson, I invite you to continue with lesson 12.

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